What Is the Toughest Part About Working Out?


Working out can be a great way to get fit and feel better, and it can also be a great way to spend your free time. There are tons of different workouts you can do, so you can find something that’s right for you. No matter what you choose, it isn’t always going to be easy.

What Is the Toughest Part About Working Out? The hardest part about working out is the first part–getting started. Forming a new habit, like working out, is a struggle.  It takes effort to turn it into a habit.  However, after you make it a habit, then you will face new struggles, such as hitting a wall.

Whether you are new to working out or have been doing it for years, you will probably encounter a tough part. For beginners, that could be getting started. And for more experienced people, it could be hitting a wall in your fitness journey.

The Hardest Part for Beginners

When you first start working out seriously, you will face what is potentially the hardest part of the entire thing. As a beginner, you have yet to form a habit around working out. Because of that, it can be much harder for you to go to the gym when you don’t really want to.

Of course, at first, you will have an initial burst of motivation. Perhaps you bought a new set of workout gear, or you found a fantastic yoga class. However, once the allure of the new clothes or the class starts to fade, you may not want to head to the gym.

Working out can take a lot of work, both for your body and brain. You need to create a routine and stick to it long enough so that it becomes a habit. After you lose the motivation from the “honeymoon period” of working out, you may have to force yourself to work out.

It does not matter if you are doing workouts at home, with a class or with a personal trainer. When you first start a new exercise program, you’ll have to get over the hump at the start. And arguably, that’s the hardest part of working out for anyone.

The Hardest Part After You Form a Habit

Perhaps you have been exercising for a while, and you have made it a habit. You have a set schedule for working out, and you follow it to a T. However, you’re not immune to reaching a hard part when working out.

  • At any stage of working out, you could overwork yourself. Of course, you should push yourself in a workout. However, there is a difference between pushing yourself and hurting yourself.
  • If you push yourself too much, you might injure yourself. Depending on the injury, you may need to take it easy for a while.
  • Even if you don’t injure yourself, you may still have mental roadblocks that make you not want to work out. You will still have to work to get yourself ready so that you can complete a successful workout.

Forming a habit is not the end of hard workouts, and it shouldn’t be. Once you make working out a habit, you need to keep doing it. Continue pushing past your limits so that you can strengthen your muscles and improve your fitness. However, you also need to protect yourself so that you can minimize your risk of injury.

The Hardest Part About Your Routine

Once you have a routine in place so that you don’t struggle to find motivation, you have made working out a habit. But you might still struggle, and that’s okay. At this stage in your fitness journey, you might start to experience boredom with your workouts.

You can easily do your standard routine of 100 squats or 50 crunches. Lifting 20 pounds doesn’t take much effort anymore, and maybe you are getting faster. The ease of the routine can make you complacent in your workouts.

Now, it’s time to switch things up with how you exercise. You could change the location, like switching from your home to a gym. If possible, you could change your workout schedule and workout earlier or later in the day.

Or you can change out the specific exercises that you do. If you’re comfortable doing squats, try doing lunges. They may use the same muscles, but lunges will work your legs in a way that squats don’t since you have to focus on one leg at a time.

The Hardest Part About Scheduling Your Workouts

Working out is a great way to spend your time, but that doesn’t mean it is always easy to find the time. If you have a busy schedule, you may find that your activities are eating up your workout time. Working full time or going to school can take a lot out of you.

However, you should also consider how often you should work out. In some cases, working out each day is a good thing. But if you are new to working out or otherwise busy, you don’t always have to work out every day.

  • Think of any fitness goals you have and when you want to reach them. If you are training to run a marathon, you will probably need to work in time each day.
  • But if you are new to working out, and your goal is to get fit, you may have more flexibility with your workout schedule.
  • At first, it can help to work out a few times each week. As you work out more and build stamina and strength, you can increase your frequency to almost daily.
  • If you want to do cardio workouts, set a goal of doing them five times each week.
  • You can spend the other couple of days doing strength training, but make sure to rotate through different muscle groups.

Finding the time to work out can be difficult, especially if you have other responsibilities. It can be so hard that it might be the hardest part about working out seriously. However, if you can set a realistic schedule, it will be easier to stick with it.

The Hardest Part for Serious Athletes

Serious athletes face a lot of challenges when it comes to working out seriously. One of the biggest challenges is managing your training time. Of course, you need to train enough so that you feel prepared for your next race or event.

However, you also don’t want to overwork yourself or develop an injury due to overtraining. Finding that balance will depend on you and what sport or activity you do. It could also depend on the time of year that it is.

If you play a seasonal sport, you still need to maintain your training during the off-season. But when you are training for the current season, you will need to exercise more. During this time, you must find a delicate balance of working out, eating right, and resting.

Of course, a lot of serious athletes have personal trainers or access to a team trainer. However, that does not mean you won’t face obstacles. Even with a trainer, you still have to do the workouts, and you must avoid injuries.

How to Make Working Out Easier

No matter where you’re at in your fitness journey, you can make it easier on yourself. Consider what you want to get out of your workouts. Set reasonable goals based on your current skill level and schedule.

If you need accountability, try joining a fitness class or find a workout buddy. Then, you have someone to keep you accountable, and you can motivate each other to stay on track. Plus, you can help each other through the hardest parts of working out.

abel

Retired Athlete, Retired Personal Trainer, Retired University Teacher, Retired Sales Manager...

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